Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Housing Construction Boom Begins This Year

Housing Construction Boom Begins This Year?

New-home construction may finally be on the mend: Housing permits, a gauge of future homebuilding activity, are at a post-crisis high.

Since the housing crisis, analysts have been waiting for population growth to once again boost demand for construction. Housing starts have remained well below pre-crisis norms for years.
Last week, the Census Bureau reported that new housing permits were up by more than 11 percent from April, reaching a post-crisis high of 1,275,000.
But that turnaround may be now.
In recent commentary, Jonathan Smoke, realtor.com®'s chief economist, notes: "The increasing level of new construction is entirely consistent with the strong demand and corresponding price gains we have been seeing in both rents and home prices … Builders are more confident as a result of seeing more traffic."
Smoke notes that the last time the housing market index from the National Association of Home Builders, which measures builder sentiment, was this high was in 2005, the height of the housing bubble. 
John Burns, CEO of John Burns Real Estate Consulting, says in recent commentary that a turnaround is critical in homebuilding to meet growing household formations.
"Even with the most conservative of assumptions, household formations will boom over the next 15 years, and we will need well in excess of 1.5 million homes built per year to meet the demand," Burns says. "That is 50 percent more than we built last year."

Contact Stacey Guzanick 262.490.3696,   RE/MAX Realty Center  Guzanick@gmail.com,  if you have questions about buying a house or selling one.

I can  guide you  toward your next home.

www.HomesWithStacey.com

See you at the closing!

Monday, June 29, 2015

Easily Remove Wall Stains


Contact Stacey Guzanick 262.490.3696,   RE/MAX Realty Center  Guzanick@gmail.com,  if you have questions about buying a house or selling one.

I can  guide you  toward your next home.

www.HomesWithStacey.com

See you at the closing!

Sunday, June 28, 2015

10 Cheap Ways to Increase the Value of Your Home



Contact Stacey Guzanick 262.490.3696,   RE/MAX Realty Center  Guzanick@gmail.com,  if you have questions about buying a house or selling one.

I can  guide you  toward your next home.

www.HomesWithStacey.com

See you at the closing!

Saturday, June 27, 2015

Season-by-Season Lawn Maintenance Calendar

Season-by-Season Lawn Maintenance Calendar




Start your lawn care by following our season-by-season lawn maintenance calendar. Get a barefoot-worthy lawn and ensure your home has curb appeal.
Early Spring
Like so many maintenance jobs, everything goes smoother -- and you’ll get better results -- with proper preparation. Early spring is the time to get ready for lawn-growing and mowing season.

Related:
 How to Bring Back Your Lawn After Winter Damage
Sharpen mower blades to ensure clean cuts. A dull blade tears the grass, leaving jagged edges that discolor the lawn and invite pathogens.

Sharpen mower blades once each month during grass-cutting season. Have a backup blade (about $20) so that a sharp one is always on hand.

Tune up your mower with a new sparkplug ($3 to $5) and air filter ($5 to $10). Your mower might not need a new sparkplug every season, but changing it is a simple job, and doing it every year ensures you won’t forget the last time you replaced your sparkplug.

Buy fresh gas. Gas that’s been left to sit over the winter can accumulate moisture that harms small engines. This is especially true for fuel containing ethanol, so use regular grades of gasoline.

If you need to dump old gasoline, ask your city or county for local disposal sites that take old fuel.

Clean up your lawn. Time to get out the leaf rakes and remove any twigs and leaves that have accumulated over the winter. A thick layer of wet leaves can smother a lawn if not immediately removed in early spring. Cleaning up old debris clears the way for applying fertilizer and herbicides.

Spring
Early Summer
Summer
Early Fall
Fall

Spring

Depending on your weather, your grass will now start growing in earnest, so be ready for the first cutting. Don’t mow when the grass is wet — you could spread diseases, and wet clippings clog up lawn mowers.

Fertilizing: Both spring and fall are good times to fertilize your lawn. In the northern third of the country, where winters are cold, fertilize in fall — cool weather grasses go dormant over winter and store energy in their roots for use in the spring.

For the rest of the country, apply fertilizer just as your grass begins its most active growth. For best results, closely follow the application directions on the product. You’ll spend about $50 to $75 per application for an average 1/4-acre lot.

Aeration: Aerating punches small holes in your lawn so water, fertilizers, and oxygen reach grass roots. Pick a day when the soil is damp but not soaked so the aeration machine can work efficiently.

Related: More about lawn aeration

Pre-emergent herbicides: Now is the time to apply a pre-emergent herbicide to prevent crabgrass and other weeds from taking root in your lawn. A soil thermometer is a handy helper; you can pick one up for $10 to $20. When you soil temperature reaches 58 degrees — the temperature at which crabgrass begins to germinate — it’s time to apply the herbicide.

Early Spring
Early Summer
Summer
Early Fall
Fall

Early Summer

Watch out for grubs: Warm weather means that grub worms, the larvae stage of June, Japanese, and other beetles, start feeding on the tender root systems of lawns. Affected lawns show browning and wilting patches.

To be certain that the culprits are grubs, pull back the sod and look for white, C-shaped grubs. If you see more than 10 per square foot, your lawn should be treated with a chemical pesticide.

Milky spore is an environmentally friendly way to control some species of grubs. When using insecticides, read and follow all label directions, and water the product into the soil immediately. Cost is around $50 to $75 per application.

Grass-cutting tip: Your grass is starting to grow fast, and you might even be cutting more than once a week to keep up. To keep grass healthy, mow often enough so you’re removing no more than 1/3 of the grass blade.

Pesky weeds: Weeds that have escaped an herbicide application should be removed with a garden fork. Use a post-emergent herbicide only if you think the situation is getting out of hand.

Check out our guide to some common types of weeds and tips on how to get rid of them.

Early Spring
Spring
Summer
Early Fall
Fall

Summer

Here’s a good mantra to guide you through the heart of grass-mowing season: The taller the grass, the deeper the roots, the fewer the weeds, and the more moisture the soil holds between watering.

With that in mind, here’s how to ensure a healthy, green lawn:
  • Set your mower blade height to 3 inches.
  • Deep and infrequent watering is better for lawns than frequent sprinkles, which promote shallow root growth. In general, lawns need about 1 inch of water per week to maintain green color and active growth.
Lawns that receive less than that will likely go dormant. That’s okay, the grass is still alive, but dormant lawns should still receive at least 1 inch of water per month. Your grass will green up again when the weather brings regular rains.
  • To check the output of a sprinkler, scatter some pie tins around the yard to see how much water collects in a specific length of time. Having a rain gauge ($5 to $20) will help you keep track of how much water the lawn receives naturally.
  • At least once each month, clean underneath your mower to prevent spreading lawn diseases.
  • Although it’s OK to leave grass clippings on the lawn where they can decompose and nourish the soil, large clumps of clippings should be removed. Regularly rake up any leaves, twigs, and debris.
If your grass seems to be stressed out, check out our advice on what to do if your lawn is turning brown.

Early Spring
Spring
Early Summer
Early Fall
Fall

Early Fall

The best time to patch bare or thin spots is when the hot, dry days of summer have given way to cooler temps. Follow these simple steps:

1. Remove any dead grass.

2. Break up the soil with a garden trowel.

3. Add an inch of compost and work it into the soil.

4. Add grass seed that’s designed for shade or full sun, depending on the area you’re working on. Spread the seed evenly across the bare patch.

5. Use a hard-tooth rake to work the seed into the soil to a depth of about half an inch.

6. Sprinkle grass clippings over the patch to help prevent the soil from drying out.

7. Water the area; you’ll want to keep the patch moist, so lightly water once a day until the seed germinates and the new grass gets about one inch tall.

Early Spring
Spring
Early Summer
Summer
Fall

Fall

Your main job in fall is to keep your lawn free of leaves and other debris. You can use a mulching mower to break up leaves and add the organic matter to your soil, but be sure to clean up any clumps so they don’t kill the grass.

In the northern one-third of the country, now is the time to fertilize your lawn. Your grass will store the nutrients in its roots as it goes dormant over the winter, and your lawn will be ready for a jump start when spring warms the ground.

This is also the time to clean up your garden.

Early Spring
Spring
Early Summer
Summer
Early Fall

Contact Stacey Guzanick 262.490.3696,   RE/MAX Realty Center  Guzanick@gmail.com,  if you have questions about buying a house or selling one.

I can  guide you  toward your next home.

www.HomesWithStacey.com


See you at the closing!



By: Douglas Trattner
Read more: http://members.houselogic.com/articles/lawn-maintenance-calendar/preview/#ixzz3dQo2utk6
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Friday, June 26, 2015

Guide to Hardwood Flooring



 Guide to Hardwood Flooring



Satin and glossy finishes


Wood Finishes

finish is a top coat that will protect your floor from everyday wear and tear. The finish is also what gives the floor its color and luster. Finishes are a great way to personalize your hardwood floors. Whether you like light-colored wood or dark, a satin finish or high-gloss, the options are endless.
When considering finishes, you need to decide whether you want to apply it yourself or buy pre-finished flooring. Pre-finished flooring offers a wide variety of wood species and saves hours of labor and cleanup, while unfinished wood floors allow you to have a customized finish. Though pre-finished flooring can cost as much as $1.50 more per square foot than unfinished, it may save you some mistakes. You also get an extended factory finish warranty with pre-finished floors. Regardless of whether you opt for pre-finishing or finishing the floor yourself, you will need to know what types of finishes are available.
There are two kinds of hardwood finishes: surface finishes and penetrating finishes.
Surface Finishes
Surface finishes are the most popular kind. They require a stain to achieve the desired color and then a top coat of polyurethane or varnish for protection. Surface finishes are easy to maintain and quite durable. The four surface finishes are:
  • Oil-Based Urethane - The most common surface finish, oil-based urethane is applied in two or three coats and is available in gloss, semi-gloss and satin sheens. The downside to this type of finish is the drying time -- up to 8 hours for each coat. You will also need adequate ventilation. And, keep in mind that oil-based urethane finishes do yellow with age.
  • Water-Based Urethane - A good option for the DIY-er, this finish dries quickly and cleans up easily with soap and water. Water-based urethane has less odor than oil-based urethane and doesn't yellow over time.
  • Moisture-Cured Urethane - Slightly more durable than others, this finish is most often used on commercial projects and is best handled by a professional.
  • Conversion Varnish - Because of the strong odor and fumes, this finish should only be applied by a professional.
Penetrating Finishes
Penetrating finishes penetrate the wood deeper than surface finishes. The finish soaks into the wood and then a wax is applied to give a low-gloss sheen. With this finish, wax needs to be reapplied periodically and only certain cleaners can be used on the floor. For this reason, surface finishes may be a better bet for the non-professional installer.
Next, as if there weren't enough options already, you also have to select the sheen of your finish. Sheen is the shine of the floor. You can choose from high gloss (very shiny), low gloss or satin finish.
Though high-gloss finishes look professional, they show scratches more easily. Low-gloss or satin finishes are typically used in residential hardwood floor installations. Keep in mind that if you go with pre-finished flooring, you will need to make the finishing decisions when you order the product.


Contact Stacey Guzanick 262.490.3696,   RE/MAX Realty Center  Guzanick@gmail.com,  if you have questions about buying a house or selling one.

I can  guide you  toward your next home.

www.HomesWithStacey.com

See you at the closing!


Thursday, June 25, 2015

Master Bathroom Must Haves


Master Bathroom Must-Haves



 Supersized master showers reign, according to the 2015 Houzz Bathroom Trends Study. Showers are expanding with many of the more than 3,000 home owners recently surveyed saying they plan to upgrade their master showers and increase its size.
Northeast home owners were found to have the biggest love for their master showers and are planning the most upgrades. But many non-master full baths, especially in the West, are also getting supersized shower stalls, the survey found.
Thirty percent of those surveyed by Houzz who say they have plans to upgrade their master shower plan to make it 50 percent or more larger than its current size; 19 percent plan to make it between 25 percent to 50 percent larger.
But the master shower isn’t the only driver to bathroom remodels. The Houzz survey found respondents rated the following functional aspects as important factors in their bathroom remodels:
  • Easy to clean: 55%
  • Easy to store and find: 53%
  • Good lighting: 47%
  • Two-person compatible: 46%
  • Easy to get ready in: 36%
  • Helps me relax: 34%
What’s more, the design of the space is also important. Survey respondents identified the following top design aspects of a master bathroom:
  • Stylish and beautiful: 83%
  • Spa-like atmosphere: 41%
  • Reflects who I am: 38%
  • Filled with natural light: 34%
  • Makes a statement: 23%
Other top characteristics identified by survey respondents for master bathroom remodels are:
  • Ceramic tile, followed by porcelain tile, is the most popular flooring choice.
  • Painted walls are by far the most popular choice, while wallpaper is only used in 3 percent of remodels.
  • Recessed lighting and wall sconces dominate as the most popular lighting choices.
  • Baby boomers are more likely to install grab bars and curbless showers in their master bathroom remodels. But non-slide floors, hand-held shower heads, shower seats or tub seats, and thermostatic mixers are growing in popularity among all generations.
Survey respondents also identified the following specialty features as the most important in luxury master bathroom remodels:
  • Rain shower head
  • Tub for two
  • Spa jets in tubs
  • Radiant heat flooring
  • Shower for two

Contact Stacey Guzanick 262.490.3696,   RE/MAX Realty Center  Guzanick@gmail.com,  if you have questions about buying a house or selling one.

I can  guide you  toward your next home.

www.HomesWithStacey.com

See you at the closing!

By Melissa Dittmann Tracey, REALTOR(R) Magazine

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

No Pussyfooting! Keep a Close Eye on Your Cat When Moving

No Pussyfooting! Keep a Close Eye on Your Cat When Moving

Yes, it's a cat sleeping on a laptop.

Your feline friends find comfort in routine, so disruption can cause stress for them. When it’s time to move, make sure to take precautions by prepping your cat for the transition.
Keep tabs on your cat during the moving chaos—the last thing you want is your cat wandering away while you’re busy with moving. On moving day, designate a room for your kitty and keep it behind the room’s closed door. If you will need access to all rooms, try putting your cat in its carrier instead.

Upon arrival at your new place, keep your cat in a quiet area away from the hubbub of unloading. Again, make sure it’s a place that won’t allow your cat to stray too far. Once the movers have left, you can expect your kitty to be skittish and a bit curious. Let your cat explore your new surroundings, but don’t let it go outside unsupervised.
When you transport your cat, make sure it is comfortable in its carrier. It may howl and cry while you’re making your way to your new home, so try putting a towel over the crate to keep it calm. Make sure your cat has comfy blankets and/or towels in the crate. If you feel that your kitty may be overly stressed by the change of scenery, check with your vet about putting it on anti-anxiety medication prior to your move.
As you move in, you will also want to make sure your new place is cat-proof. Look for exposed cords or wires, windows without screens, or tight spaces where your kitty could get stuck. Clean up any concerns and also make sure that your cat is surrounded with familiar items—toys, blankets, food—that will help it form a bond with its new home.
After a couple of weeks, your cat should be familiarized with its new surroundings. When you feel comfortable that your cat knows where home is, you can let your it wander around outside. Keep a bowl of food outside so your kitty has a familiar smell to return to.

Contact Stacey Guzanick 262.490.3696,   RE/MAX Realty Center  Guzanick@gmail.com,  if you have questions about buying a house or selling one.

I can  guide you  toward your next home.

www.HomesWithStacey.com

See you at the closing!

Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Budget Kitchen Remodeling Money Saving Steps

Budget Kitchen Remodeling: 5 Money-Saving Steps



Can't afford an entire kitchen remodel in one fell swoop? You can complete the work in 5 budget-saving stages (and still cook dinner during the down time).
Major kitchen remodels are among the most popular home improvements, but a revamped cooking and gathering space can set you back a pretty penny. According to "Remodeling" magazine's 2015 "Cost vs. Value Report," a major, 200-square-foot kitchen remodel costs $56,768, with a 67.8% return on investment come selling time.

If you can’t come up with all that cash or take out a loan to do the remodel in one shot, a good strategy is to proceed in stages. By breaking down the kitchen remodeling process, you’ll be able to proceed at your own pace, as time and money allow.

Related: Stress Less! 6 Things You Can Do for an Anxiety-Free Remodel
Stage One: Start with a Complete Design Plan 

Your plan should be comprehensive and detailed — everything from the location of the refrigerator to which direction the cabinet doors will open to whether you need a spice drawer.

To save time (and money) during tear-out and construction, plan on using your existing walls and kitchen configuration. That’ll keep plumbing and electrical systems mostly intact, and you won’t have the added expense — and mess — of tearing out walls.

Joseph Feinberg, vice president of Allied Kitchen and Bath in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., recommends hiring a professional designer, such as an architect or a certified kitchen designer, who can make sure the details of your plans are complete. You’ll pay about 10% of the total project for a pro designer, but you’ll save a whole bunch of headaches that would likely cost as much — or more — to fix. Plus, a pro is likely to offer smart solutions you hadn’t thought of.

For a nominal fee, you also can get design help from a major home improvement store. However, you’ll be expected to purchase some of your cabinets and appliances from that store.
  • Cost: professional designer: $5,800 (10% of total)
  • Key strategies: Once your plans are set, you can hold onto them until you’re ready to remodel.
  • Time frame: 3 to 6 months

Contact Stacey Guzanick 262.490.3696,   RE/MAX Realty Center  Guzanick@gmail.com,  if you have questions about buying a house or selling one.

I can  guide you  toward your next home.

www.HomesWithStacey.com

See you at the closing!

Read more: http://members.houselogic.com/articles/budget-kitchen-remodeling-advice/preview/?sf9942087=1#ixzz3dQgVq29q
Follow us: @HouseLogic on Twitter | HouseLogic on Facebook

By: Gretchen Roberts

Monday, June 22, 2015

Fitting Fitness Into Your Day

Fitting Fitness Into Your Day

Too busy to find time for a workout? Here are some ideas for incorporating physical activity while you're on the job.
Kelly Colbourne was so focused on building her business when she started her real estate career in 2005 that she neglected to make time to take care of herself. To accommodate the long hours and hectic pace of the job, she would snack on the go, making meals out of things like fresh-baked cookies at new-home construction offices. Her weight eventually climbed above 200 pounds, and that’s when she knew she needed to make a change.
Squeeze In a Workout
About 100 practitioners submitted to REALTOR® Magazine their solutions for squeezing in physical fitness into their busy workdays. Here are some of their ideas:
Hold a contest: Set up a workplace wellness challenge over a week or month under a theme, such as “Fixin and Football,” a 21-day challenge to lose weight and score a favorite NFL or college football team T-shirt. Elizabeth J. Leos with RE/MAX Alliance Greeley in Arvada, Colo., helps to set up such workplace challenges by creating a private group on Facebook so that she and her peers can have greater accountability and support as they all stretch toward a common fitness or nutrition goal. The winner’s reward could be monetary or just bragging rights. If you need inspiration for your own office fitness challenge, check out30DayFitnessChallenges.comfor ideas.
Quick downtime workouts:Colbourne loads 10-minute workout videos on her iPad and has them ready to go when she finds a short period of downtime in the day. The workouts are simple enough as to not make her too sweaty during the day. Colbourne prefers Natalie Jill Fitness videos on YouTube. If she squeezes in three of them, she will have accomplished 30 minutes of exercise for the day. “I’ll sneak in squats while waiting for clients,” she says.
Get out of your chair:Standing burns more calories than sitting, so you can fit in physical activity even when you’re stuck at your desk. Andrew Gavin with Zimkin Realty in San Diego swapped out his desk chair for a standing desk, which keeps him on his feet and encourages less sedentary behavior during the day.
Make meetings more active:Catch up with your co-workers over a long stroll in your farming area. Jane Lowell with Max Broock, REALTORS® in Birmingham, Mich., will walk two to three miles twice a week with two other real estate agents. “Not only do we get some fitness in but we discuss our current business and what’s in store for the week and weekend for us. It gives us a chance to catch up and plan,” Lowell says.
Ditch the car: For your next nearby appointment, grab your bike. “As an REO agent, I did many of my property checks via bicycle and also would sometimes ride home from the office [40 miles],” says Joslyn Panka Solomon with Century 21 Moline Realty Inc. in Cambridge, Minn.
Promote yourself with your workout: Philanthropy can get you moving as well as help spread your good name in the community. Samantha Mead Williams with Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate Generations in Spanish Fort, Ala., participates in fundraising runs with Team in Training for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. She also has participated in the St. Jude Memphis2Mobile relay, which takes runners from Mobile, Ala., to Memphis, Tenn.
Take a break: Schedule time in your day to step away from work for 30 minutes or an hour, whether that’s in the morning or afternoon. Book your exercise time as an appointment within your day. Some days, Stephanie Granlund with RE/MAX Preferred Properties in Oakton, Va., will wake up at 6 a.m. to work until 11, and then go for a swim during her lunch break. On other days, she’ll exercise in the morning before work. “I think the key to sticking with it is that working out is an integral part of my life,” she says. “It has to get done, and it isn’t negotiable.”
“Health-wise, I was miserable,” recalls Colbourne, a sales associate with Century 21 Baytree in Rockledge, Fla. “I felt sluggish and exhausted all the time.”
Kelly: Before & After
 
The transformations Colbourne made in her lifestyle helped her lose more than 100 pounds over two years. She started adding hip-hop, Zumba, and toning exercise classes to her schedule at least two times a week; eating a more balanced diet that includes more high-fiber foods; carrying healthy snacks with her during the workday, such as apples and nuts; increasing her water intake (she buys gallon water jugs to drink during the day); and squeezing in exercises during downtime, such as calf raises or squats while scanning documents or making copies.
Colbourne has kept the weight off since 2012.
“I’ve learned it’s definitely doable to have work-life balance in real estate,” she says Colbourne. “I’m not as exhausted as I was back then. I’m happier with my career and myself, and I’m more confident.” 
Finding time to incorporate some physical activity into your day isn’t just about keeping your body healthy. It can also help you perform better at work.Researchers have linked exercise to improved memory, concentration, and mood, as well as lower stress levels. Realizing that boost to workers’ well-being, more brokerages are weaving in fitness talks at conferences and even staff meetings.
Dana Mauro, a broker at two RE/MAX offices in Brick and Lavallette, N.J., teaches other agents the importance of “me time” every day, “whether it’s an hour of cardio, weight training, or just taking 15 minutes to yourself,” she says. Mauro is also a bodybuilding competitor who has been nationally qualified by the National Physique Committee. “Once you feel good, you will go out and do great things. The root always starts with the agent.”
Getting involved with the local fitness community can also lead to finding new business. Lorie Couch, and agent with Coldwell Banker-Bullard Realty in Jackson, Ga., has gotten leads just from wearing a real estate-branded T-shirt while working out at a gym. She’s also started a walking group in her community whose route takes them by listed homes in the area.
Emily Danner, an agent with Keller Williams Realty in Johnson City, Tenn., set out to power walk 2,013 miles throughout the year in 2013, which sparked the curiosity of her clients. She started using the hashtag #powerwalker in her social media business channels.
“It resonated with people,” says Danner, who lost 70 pounds 12 years ago and has kept the weight off. “I believe showing the commitment and discipline to do a fitness goal — like walking the same miles as the year in 2013, doing the Navy SEAL challenge [a series of physical fitness challenges, such as running and swimming] in 2014, and now training for a Super Spartan [an eight-mile obstacle course/mud run] — show my potential and present clients that I am the type of go-getter person they want working for them.”
Fitness is also a great way to expand your sphere of influence. When Steve Strode, a broker with Meadows Group Inc., REALTORS® in Portland, Ore., relocated there from Wisconsin, he found fitness became not only a way to stay in shape but also to meet others.
“As a way of meeting people and creating a sphere, joining a running group was an integral part of it,” Strode says. “You get to know people really well over one- to four-hour runs and build deep and lasting connections.” He’s even there for his clients to cheer them on in reaching their own fitness goals. He served on the pace crew for one of his clients who was completing his first marathon.
“This job is crazy and, at times, very stressful,” says Samantha Mead Williams with Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate Generations in Spanish Fort, Ala. Mead has tried a mix of fitness routines, everything from boot camp workouts, Zumba, and Pilates to Crossfit. “If it was offered on Groupon, I bought it,” she says. Her best fitness secret is to commit to doing one physical activity a day, five days a week — any activity, length, time, speed, or location.
Exercise, she says, can be thought of as that “little timeout where we can turn off our professional voices and escape into our inside voices, pushing that reset button and finding strength and confidence in a nice long run or new squat program. For me, its just a little reminder that I can do more than just write contracts and drive carpool. It is a palpable way to realize your capabilities are self-set, and the ability to grow comes with effort.”

Contact Stacey Guzanick 262.490.3696,   RE/MAX Realty Center  Guzanick@gmail.com,  if you have questions about buying a house or selling one.

I can  guide you  toward your next home.

www.HomesWithStacey.com

See you at the closing!